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Golfer’s Dilemma–What would you do?

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This brief video is 78 seconds long, and will bring a smile to a golfer’s face!

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Bay Area Food News in 2012

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From SF Chron, December 27, 2012, and article by Paolo Lucchesi.  Nice summary of the restaurant business in SF, comings and goings.

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Advice for the Holidays

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Received this email from friend Mike:

First, I wish you all a Merry Christmas season and a wonderful New Year. May you and your family be well and have a wonderful festive season.

Now, please be careful during the many holiday parties, and I would like to share a personal experience with all of you about drinking and driving.

As you well know, some of us have been known to have had brushes with the police on our way home from an occasional social session over the years. A couple of nights ago, I was out for an evening with friends and had a couple of cocktails and a rather nice bottle of Pinot Noir. Knowing full well I may have been slightly over the limit, I did something I never done before~~I took a cab home. Sure enough, I passed a police sobriety check point, but since I was in a cab, they waved it past. I arrived home safe and sound without incident, which was a real surprise; as I have never driven a cab before and am not sure what to do with it now that it’s in my garage!

Cheers and Happy Holidays,

Mike

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Stamps

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We were on our way to Napa when my 18 year-old son called…”Hi Dad, what are you guys doing?”  I replied, “On our to Napa for the weekend,” upon which we heard a big sigh.  “Why, what’s the problem?”, I ask.  In a serious tone he says, ” I need a stamp.”

In the entirety of my son’s life, stamps came from Dad!

I am proud of both of my sons, as they have become terrific responsible young men.  However, I will never forget that brief conversation as a measure of how dependency often leads to helplessness for even the most trivial of things.

While humorous in retrospect, it’s also a cautionary tale–and metaphorical in a political perspective.

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Education begins at 60!

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I recently came across this passage by Mortimer J. Adler, an author and former Chairman of the Board of Encyclopedia Britannica and Co-Founder of The Center for the Study of Great Ideas.  I first encountered Mr. Adler in a terrific book called “How to Read a Book” which changed my reading habits forever.

“For more than forty years, a controlling insight in my educational philosophy has been the recognition that no one has ever been–no one can ever be–educated in school or college.  That would be the case if our schools and colleges were at their very best, which they certainly are not, and even if the students were among the best and the brightest, as well as conscientious in the application of their powers.  The reason is simply that youth itself–immaturity–is an insuperable obstacle to becoming educated.  Schooling is for the young.  Education comes later.  The very best thing for our schools to do is to prepare the young for continued learning in later life by giving them the skills of learning and the love of it.

To speak of an educated young person or of a wise young person, rich in the understanding of basic ideas and issues, is as much a contradiction in terms as to speak of a round square.   The young can  be prepared for education in the years to come, but only mature men and women can become educated, beginning the process in their forties and fifties and reaching some modicum of genuine insight, sound judgment and practical wisdom after they have turned sixty.

Those who take this prescription seriously would, of course, be better off if their schooling had given them the intellectual discipline and skill they need to carry it out, and if it also had introduced them to the world of learning with some appreciation of its basic ideas and issues.  But even the individual who is fortunate enough to leave  school or college with a mind so disciplined, and with an abiding love of learning, would still have a long road to travel before he or she became an educated person.  If our schools and colleges were doing their part and adults were doing theirs, all would be well.  However, our schools and colleges are not doing their part because they are trying to do everything else.  And adults are not doing their part because most are under the illusion that they had completed their education when they finished their schooling.

Only the person who realizes that mature life is the time to get the education that no young person can ever acquire is at last on the high road to learning.  The road is steep and rocky, but it is the high road, open to anyone who has skill in learning and the ultimate goal of all learning in view–understanding the nature of things and man’s place in the total scheme.   An educated person is one who through the travail of his own life has assimilated the ideas that make him representative of his culture, that make him a bearer of its traditions and enable him to contribute to its improvement.”

These wise words echo my own feelings of about the subject.  As the educational establishment is coming under more scrutiny and as education gets more expensive without apparent concomitant increase in value, perhaps this is food for thought.

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