“Optimal Music for the Gym”

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From WSJ, April 2, 2013, in the section on ‘Your Health.’ discusses music for your workouts.

  • At the right tempo, music can reduce the sense of exertion as well as boost motivation
  • When athletes synchronize their movements to a musical beat, their bodies can handle more exertion
  • Music can alter emotional and physiological arousal much like a pharmacological stimulant or sedative
  •  The benefits of music seem most pronounced during low-to-moderate-intensity exercise,…more effective for recreational exercisers than elite athletes

Seems to confirm that the right exercise equipment includes a good playlist!

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Posted in: NutrEx

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Ichiro Suzuki’s Secret Gym, Wall Street Journal

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This Wall Street Journal article from March 5, 2013, adds some interesting information about the definition of “fitness” particularly as it relates specifically to baseball.

“I believe flexibilitygives me my strength,” Ichiro explains.  “Flexibility is my weapon.”

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Posted in: NutrEx

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Who Is: Jean Hoefliger

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GM and Winemaker for Alpha Omega

www.aowinery.com

Consulting Winemaker for

  • Audace Wines
  • Sunshine Valley Wines
  • Virage
  • Clark-Claudon
  • The Debate
  • Red Tail Hawk Winery
  • Armanino Family Cellars
  • Decades5
  • Monteverro, Capalbia, Italy
  • Maldonado Vineyard

Formerly,

  • Winemaker, Newton Vineyard
  • Asst Winemaker, Chateau Lynch-Bages
  • Asst Winemaker, Chateau Carbonnieux

From www.premiernapawines.com,

Country born: Switzerland

Education: Winemaking and viticulture degree at the Swiss Federal School of Changins.

Bio: Jean Hoefliger was born and raised in Switzerland. His experience took him from Switzerland to Bordeaux and South Africa, making wine at the esteemed estates of Chateau Lynch-Bages, Chateau Carbonnieux and Meerlust. Completing a winemaking and viticulture degree at the Swiss Federal School of Changins, Jean came to California in 2001 where he spent five years as winemaker for Newton Vineyard. He joined Alpha Omega in 2006.

Winemaking philosophy: Jean’s winemaking decisions are based solely on taste, starting in the vineyards and continuing through fermentation. Jean tries to bring the true character of the vine and the terroir into the wine by making naturally fermented, unfined and unfiltered wines that show elegance, finesse and the capacity to age

Honors / Awards: While at Newton Vineyards, Jean’s Epic Merlot and Puzzle 2002 received 94 points from Robert Parker, and 97 points on the 2003 Unfiltered Chardonnay. Most recently, with his new project Alpha Omega, the AO flagship wine ERA 2006 scored 94 from the Wine Spectator on its first release. The ERA 2007 scored 92 points from Robert Parker and the Proprietary Red 2006 scored 95 points from the Wine Enthusiast and was also chosen as a “Top Cellar Collection” for the year. The Chardonnay 2007 received a 94 in Wine Spectator and the To Kalon 2007 received a 97 from the Wine Enthusiast.

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Posted in: Who Is, Wine and Food

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Who Is: Michel Rolland

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From a recent bio provided by Artisan Wine Depot,

Michel Rolland is arguably the world’s most famous consulting winemaker; he has worked for the absolute best of the best wineries from around the world:

  • Angélus
  • Ausone
  • Pontet-Canet in Pauillac
  • Ornellaia in Tuscany
  • Harlan Estate
  • Bryant Family
  • Araujo
  • Dalla Valle
  • Staglin Family

A New York Times article on Michel Rolland: 

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Tribidrag to Zinfandel, the Nobel History–Jon Bonne’

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From the March 3, 2013 article in the SF Chron, Jon Bonne’discusses the historical lineage of California’s favored grape.

I suggest we keep the name Zinfandel–Tribidrag doesn’t exactly roll off your tongue…

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Posted in: Wine and Food

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Beethoven to Foos

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Mom’s note to me about my piano lineage.  I was the first in the family, and she had the energy to keep me nailed to the piano bench for daily practice before I could play with the neighborhood kids.  Had some pretty good teachers, as we went from Tracy to Japan, where I took lessons from a Japanese concert pianist, and then on to Germany where I took lessons from Herr Jungling for three years.  This culminated in a piano solo at my high school with orchestra accompaniment–an awesome experience.  Mom hand wrote this note for me a few years ago to draw my piano lineage from Herr Jungling to Beethoven.  Kinda cool, don’t you think?

 

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Posted in: My Musings

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Character

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Source unknown, found at www.choicedrivenlife.com

Watch your thoughts, for they become your words,

Watch your words, for they become your actions,

Watch your actions, for they become your habits,

Watch your habits, for they become your character,

Watch your character, for it becomes your destiny.

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Recommended Wines

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February 4, 2013, from Jennifer Hagan:  Recent trip to Duckhorn Winery, enjoyed a bottle with a black label called “Discussion” a bourdeaux blend, and highly recommends it.   I called the winery, and they are sold out of the ’08, with the release of the ’09 expected in April, at $125 per bottle.  Based on past history of Duckhorn wines, this will be one to try.

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Posted in: Wine and Food

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“Fisking”

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From wikipedia:

A point-by-point refutation of a blog entry or (especially) news story. A really stylish fisking is witty, logical, sarcastic and ruthlessly factual; flaming or handwaving is considered poor form.

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Posted in: Definitions

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Time to Chill Out on Global Warming, by Charles L. Hopper

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This article was published on January 17, 2013, on the Hoover Institution Journal, called Defining Ideas, www.definingideas.org; Charles L. Hooper is president of Objective Insights, a company that consults for pharmaceutical and biotech companies, and is a visiting fellow at the Hoover Institution.

This extract I found most interesting and compelling.

“…consider the significance of the Vikings in Greenland.  Erik the Red, the legendary Viking, was exiled from Iceland and sailed to Greenland in 982 AD, where he found birch trees and hills blanketed in green grass. From 985 to 1408, the Vikings had vibrant farming settlements on Greenland. However, if you go there today, you won’t see any farms or even any Viking kids running around; you will see ruins.  Why did the Vikings leave Greenland?  It turns out that the Viking settlements coincided with the Medieval Warm Period and ended with the Little Ice Age, which caused the Vikings to leave Greenland’s deteriorating fields.

If the Vikings were able to farm Greenland a thousand years ago but would not be able to today, we can assume that the Medieval Warm Period was warmer than the climate today.  The scientific studies support this conclusion.  Over 120 published studies have formed a conclusion about the Medieval Warm Period: approximately 10 of those studies say it was cooler than today, 20 say it was equal to today, and 90 say it was warmer than today.  Of the 110 studies that quantified their results, the conclusion was that the Medieval Warm Period was, on average, about 0.5 degrees Celsius warmer than today.

Withe these results, today’s warm temperatures can be seen in the context of regular, long-term fluctuations of earth’s temperatures.  More importantly, these results appear to exonerate carbon dioxide emission.  During medieval times, the human population was just 6 percent of its current level and industrialization would not occur for almost a millennium…Something else must be driving changes in the climate because anthropogenic carbon emissions were not a factor when temperatures reached a peak hundreds of years ago.”

The full article is worth reading.

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Posted in: Climate Change

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